10 blockers to scripture study
10 blockers to scripture study

In a previous post, I talked about our responsibility to learn to truly “treasure” the word of God like the Nephites did– specifically, that we need to do better at prioritizing our study of the Book of Mormon. We need to “level up” our study so that we’re not just reading the words on the page like a novel, but truly study and dig deep.

This is all easier said than done, of course. Most of us find it really difficult to dig in and “delight” in the Book of Mormon like we ought to. Why is that? I asked my Sunday School class this question recently. They’re 16 and 17 years old, so you know they are world-class experts on all the reasons to not do something. They identified 10 obstacles they face when trying to dig deep in the Book of Mormon. Just like the defensive plays in the Super Bowl going on right now, these “blockers” can really get in the way of our scripture study:

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... Matthew Watkins
-- | 2 Feb 2020
Putting a price on the priceless
Putting a price on the priceless

Those who know me know I really like economics. It’s a fascinating subject, and even humorous at times. There’s a classic economics joke that goes something like this:

Two economists walked past a Porsche showroom. One of them pointed at a shiny car in the window and said, “I want that.”

“Obviously not,” the other replied.

OK, OK, so while economists may be smart, comedians they are not. But it’s one of my favorite jokes because of what it teaches: when it comes to economics, what you say you want is not important– it’s your spending that tells us what you really want. If the first economist in the joke really wanted the Porsche bad enough, he would scrimp and save for years or subject himself to an insane car loan so he could buy it. The fact that he is not planning to buy it means that he obviously does not value the Porsche to the amount that the showroom is asking.

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... Matthew Watkins
-- | 26 Jan 2020
Unwearyingness
Unwearyingness

I originally wrote this post in July of 2017. I’ve updated it since:


Christ gave His chosen Twelve Disciples in both continents a rare opportunity. One by one, he asked them “What is it that ye desire of me, after that I am gone to the Father?” Eleven of the Jewish Disciples and nine of the Nephite Disciples asked for the same thing:

We desire that after we have lived unto the age of man, that our ministry, wherein thou hast called us, may have an end, that we may speedily come unto thee in thy kingdom.

But John and three unnamed Nephites requested to remain on the earth and serve the Lord long after their natural lifespans. I used to wonder why the disciples were not unanimous in asking for that blessing. After all, who wouldn’t want to be a missionary forever?

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... Matthew Watkins
-- | 12 Jan 2020
Hello, my name is Moroni
Hello, my name is Moroni

This all started a few weeks ago when our primary president came to me with an interesting request. She wanted the kids to meet a very special visitor: the great Nephite prophet, Moroni. So I found myself this morning standing in front of a bunch of kids, wearing a white nightgown, holding a homemade aluminum foil leaf of the Gold Plates, and telling them “my story.”

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... Matthew Watkins
-- | 29 Dec 2019
Is Christ's grace sufficient for you?
Is Christ's grace sufficient for you?

I was reading the last chapter of the Book of Moroni the other day. Moroni is running short on time and even shorter on space on the plates at this point, so you know he’s gotta be really careful about what he includes and how he words his final messages to us. Not surprisingly, he spends the entire time testifying of Christ and the Atonement. During his last few verses– his “dying breaths” so to speak– he pleads with us to “come unto Christ, and be perfected in him, and deny yourselves of all ungodliness… and love God with all your might, mind and strength.” And, as with all scripture, this invitation comes with a promise: if we will accept Moroni’s invitation to come unto Christ, “then is his grace sufficient for you.”

The wording of that promise struck me. It sounds kind of backward, doesn’t it?

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... Matthew Watkins
-- | 15 Dec 2019
The most important battle never fought
The most important battle never fought

A previous post discussed how a rebel coalition of Lamanite soldiers combined together to stand valiantly against commands of the wicked king to go to war against the Lamanites. The rebellion could have been the turning point for the whole Lamanite nation. And they had every advantage:

  1. They had the numbers (the majority)
  2. They had the weapons
  3. They had the mountain
  4. They had the warning and foreknowledge
  5. They had the conviction

Like the Lamanite rebels, we come into life with every advantage over the forces of our own adversary. But in the end, all the advantages were not enough for the Lamanites. And if we’re careful, our advantages won’t be enough, either.

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... Matthew Watkins
-- | 8 Dec 2019
Faith to the last second
Faith to the last second

I am indebted to a wonderful sister in my ward for her testimony today. From the pulpit, she read these words of Nephi, describing his family’s efforts to start settling once they landed in the New World:

And it came to pass that we did begin to till the earth, and we began to plant seeds; yea, we did put all our seeds into the earth, which we had brought from the land of Jerusalem.

1 Ne. 18:24

See, if I were Nephi, I would be a little hesitant to plant all my seeds right away, wouldn’t you?

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... Matthew Watkins
-- | 1 Dec 2019
Sacrificing cities
Sacrificing cities

This is an edit and update of a post I originally ran in 2017. Enjoy!


Amalickiah was not successful in his first military campaign against the Nephites. His captains tried to attack the city of Ammonihah but found it so heavily fortified that it would have been suicide. So they headed to the city of Noah and swore an oath to take it or die trying. But that one was even more heavily fortified. So, they went the “die trying” route.

During the few years following, while the Lamanites were still reeling from that stunning defeat, Moroni had been preparing the hearts and cities of the Nephites to be victorious the next time Amalickiah’s forces would come. By the time Amalickiah had decided to come down himself with the rest of his army, all the cities of the Nephites had been turned into an Ancient American Fort Knox. The Nephites were totally prepared.

But when the Lamanite armies arrived in Alma 51, that preparation didn’t matter because there weren’t enough people to defend the forts. Moroni was missing. His entire army was missing.

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... Matthew Watkins
-- | 17 Nov 2019
The Three Degrees of Scripture Study
The Three Degrees of Scripture Study

The other day as I read in Mormon, I saw some really interesting wording that I thought would make a good blog post. But as I started writing about it, I realized that the only way to see the neat connection I saw was if you read the selection without regard to the verse markings. So I went on a tangent in my original post about how the verse markings can often get into our way. My thoughts and feelings kept flowing and that tangent became this whole post which I’m calling “The Three Degrees of Scripture Study.”

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... Matthew Watkins
-- | 10 Nov 2019
Great shall be the peace of thy children
Great shall be the peace of thy children

Originally posted January 5, 2017

A little while before the birth of our first kid, a wise ward member gave me some counsel I will never forget. He said that when a first child is born, there are actually three people born that day: the child is born into mortality, the woman is born into motherhood, and the man is born into fatherhood. The whole family takes a huge collective step forward in their roles. All emerge on the birthday as brand new creatures. So when my wife and I finally welcomed our son, I expected it to hit me harder. I expected my whole outlook and perspective on life would suddenly change now that I was a father. But that never happened.

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... Matthew Watkins
-- | 27 Oct 2019